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Of Winter’s Cost is the latest novel of writer and retired academic Geoff Akers, whose previous work, a fictionalised account of the life of First World War poet Isaac Rosenberg was published by the author himself, to critical acclaim.   

In Of Winter’s Cost, Sam recounts the death of his grandfather, Leo, and the effect this has had on his life.

He recalls the old man’s stories from the Shoah, and refers to his troubled life in modern Israel.


 


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Beating for Light is author Geoff Akers’ fictionalised account of the tragically short life of the First World War poet Isaac Rosenberg. If you would like to learn more about this book, click here.

Welcome to Juniper Books, publisher of Beating for Light by Geoff Akers, and showcase for his new novel Of Winter’s Cost.

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For a chapter-by-chapter synopsis of Of Winter’s Cost, click here.

Juniper Books

Of Winter’s Cost is a very powerful book skilfully drawing on the experience of a Jewish family, first in the Warsaw Ghetto and then on the West Bank. The way in which the novel draws the contrasts and parallels between the Jews as oppressed and the Jew as oppressor will strike many chords in the reader. I also see in it the best of the Judaic tradition of justice which has inspired so many of the strongest advocates of human rights. But, apart from the message which comes across so strongly, it is such a human book which will greatly move readers to an understanding of the human condition.



This sets the scene for the story, which alternates between the Warsaw ghetto during the Second World War and the disputed West Bank territories from the 1980s to the present day.


For the press release for Of Winter’s Cost, click here.

“A great theme and taut story telling: I much enjoyed it.”

Andrew Marr

“Isaac Rosenberg was one of the great soldier poets of the First World War. Unlike Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, Edmund Blunden and Robert Graves, he was not an officer but a private soldier. He was also Jewish. He died obscurely in the German offensive of March 1918. I hope that this illuminating book will help restore him to a deserved position of honour and equality with the others.”

Martin Bell

“This is a powerful and very moving account of the life and death of a Jewish poet who had already suffered so much and then joined the army only to experience the horror and brutality of the trenches, dying there as millions did.

“The novel tells us so much about persecution and despair in the life of one very talented young man, cut down before his full talents could be developed and recognised.”

Tony Benn

“In Beating for Light, Akers uses a number of sources and datum points and joins the dots skilfully with his own prose. The dialogue, the characterisation, the action, the sex: these are all fleshed out by the imagination of the author…

Akers performs a double service. Historical novels, if they are to be of any greater merit than the Archers, must tell something of a person or period we don’t know already. Akers paints a vivid picture of Rosenberg the person. One is struck with the unrelieved melo-misery, but this is probably not far from the truth. It is a good story well told. He also helps us to interpret Rosenberg’s poetry…

Some use the lecture hall; others use biography: Akers’ medium is historical fiction. Notwithstanding the impossibility of their tasks, all succeed in advancing our understanding and we are the richer for their efforts.”

Ian Gardiner, Scotland on Sunday

“It would be churlish to criticise the legacy and achievements of great war writers and poets such as Wilfred Owen and Robert Graves but Isaac Rosenberg’s poetry deserves the same status. Akers’ elegiac biography of the young poet includes much of his work. Hopefully, this powerful retelling of the story of a Jewish man who died at 28 will elevate his status.”

Michael Tierney, The Herald






herald_review.pdf.

The Herald

morning_star_review.pdf.

The Morning Star